Nuggets from Occult Invasion—The Crux of the Problem: Information Communicated | thebereancall.org

Dave Hunt

More important, for some dowsers the wand or pendulum will, in response to questions, accurately indicate the depth at which the water will be found and the flow of water per minute and even the quality of the water! No impersonal force can transmit information.

Furthermore, many modern dowsers now use dry sticks containing no moisture whatsoever, while others use metal wires and even string and plastic devices. And in addition to water, dowsers have been known to locate oil, deposits of minerals, ancient cites, buried treasure, or any number of other desirable finds. “To dowse,” writes on expert, “is to search with the aid of a hand-held instrument…for anything…subterranean water…a pool of oil…mineral ore, buried sewer pipe or an electrical cable…an airplane downed in a mountain wilderness…lost wallet or dog…a missing person….” An editorial in Gold Prospector magazine states:

“Dowsing is the easy way to get answers to your questions. You ask nature a question to which she (through your instruments) will answer with a “yes” or “no”….

“For instance, you need to find…gold; the grade of the deposit; ounces per ton; width of deposit; length of vein; and depth of deposit below surface, and the total amount of ore in tons.”

Some dowsers are even able to locate these sites for drilling, digging, or diving by drowsing over maps! Henry Gross, while sitting in Kennebunkport, Maine, located three well sites on a map of Bermuda and described accurately the depth to drill, the quality of water, and the quantity per minute which each well would produce. At that time Bermuda had gone “three hundred and forty years without drinking water” except for the rain that could be caught by various means. A plaque on a wall in Kennebunkport, Maine, reads:

IN THIS ROOM OCT. 22ND, 1949, HENRY GROSS DOWSED THREE FRESH-WATER DOMES (ROYAL BARRACKS, JENNINGS, CLAYHOUSE) ON A MAP OF BERMUDA, AN ISLAND ON WHICH NO POTABLE SPRING-WATER SUPPOSEDLY EXISTED. IN BERMUDA, DEC. 7, 1949, HENRY FOUND THE DOMES AS DOWSED IN KENNEBUNKPORT…. A DAILY 63,360 GALLONS [FROM CLAYHOUSE]….

Ted Kaufman, a retired public relations executive living in New York, has worked with New York State Rangers using his dowsing abilities to determine whether lost persons were dead or alive and to locate them on a map. The first person to discover that dowsing could be done over maps was Abbe Alexis Mermet, a French priest, around the turn of the century. “Contacted through transatlantic mail by monks desperately seeking underground water for their monastery in the mountains of Colombia, Mermet marked a potential drilling site on a map of the monastery grounds which, when drilled, produced more than the water required.” Others have dowsed over maps to locate downed aircraft in remote areas….”

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