Nuggets from Seeking and Finding God—Spiritism’s Attractive Appeal | thebereancall.org

TBC Staff

Nevertheless, some of the information passed on is extremely convincing, and the lies are irresistibly appealing. Who wouldn’t want to believe that there is neither death nor judgment and that we all have within us at our disposal infinite god-like powers if we only knew how to tap into them—a fantasy that these entities promote? Consequently, spiritism has had a great many followers since the beginning of time. Even today, this satanic delusion has hundred of millions of adherents worldwide. It has always been the prevailing indigenous peoples everywhere on earth.

Claiming to have survived death and to be speaking from “the other side,” these seducing spirits allege that after leaving their dead physical bodies, they faced no judgment but were accepted unconditionally by some higher being or white light—regardless of what they had done in their lives on earth. They further allege that after death one continues to live in a spirit world, where one learns further lessons and progresses ever higher. From such communications, the belief in “spirit survival” has arisen. Not only indigenous peoples but many top leaders of the greatest nations in history (and in our modern world as well), such as Queen Victoria and Abraham Lincoln, have been devout believers.

A major problem with this theory is that it includes no accountability or punishment for past deeds. A Hitler presumably fares no worse than a Mother Teresa, except that it will take him longer to realize his alleged true potential. This version of “life after death,” in effect, offers an escape through death from the very justice that our courts otherwise would have meted out on earth and that mankind’s sense of right and wrong knows should be imposed by the ultimate Judge. That spiritism allows and condones this escape is an offense to the innate sense of justice we all possess.

Moreover, there is no evidence that anyone will “progress” in the spirit world. Why should one’s behavior improve there from what it was here, especially in the absence of motivation that might be supplied if there were serious consequences for evil? Spirit survival must be rejected because it contradicts our innate concept of perfect justice and because there is absolutely no verifiable evidence to support it.

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