Question: I just wanted to know if you have ever read L. A. Marzulli's Politics, Prophecy, and the Supernatural and if Dave or T. A. concurs with the writer's thoughts about the Nephilim [of Genesis 6] being of Satanic origin. | thebereancall.org

Question: I just wanted to know if you have ever read L. A. Marzulli's Politics, Prophecy, and the Supernatural and if Dave or T. A. concurs with the writer's thoughts about the Nephilim [of Genesis 6] being of Satanic origin.

TBC Staff

Question: I just wanted to know if you have ever read L. A. Marzulli's Politics, Prophecy, and the Supernatural and if Dave or T.A. concurs with the writer's thoughts about the Nephilim [of Genesis 6] being of Satanic origin.

Response: There are a number of things in the Bible that aren't stated plainly and are open to reasoning from various facts found in relevant Scripture verses. The "sons of God" in Genesis 6 is one topic about which a great deal has been written, much of it relying on speculation. The premise of such speculation is that the sons of God were angelic beings who procreated with human females, from which a race of giants sprang. To derive such a conclusion from Jude 6 is not warranted: "Kept not their first estate" more likely refers to their rebellion against God and following Satan.

The volumes written about pre-Adamic races, angelic overlords, and giants begotten by angels make fascinating reading but ought to be regarded as fictionalized interpretations, since their factual basis is questionable at best.

The Bible does not tell us that angels procreate, nor does it specifically tell us whether or not begetting offspring is possible for them. In Matthew:22:30 we are told specifically that angels do not marry. Moreover, the fact that angels are spirit beings would seem to eliminate the possibility of their having sexual relations with human beings.

We realize that there are some doctrines that must be derived from a number of verses, so we're not against the inductive or deductive approach. (Take the Trinity, as just one example. The supporting verses that teach the Trinity are not speculative in nature.) In addition, when we rely on speculation to fill in areas not clearly addressed by Scripture, of necessity we create a situation generating even more questions. For example, Jesus states that "a spirit hath not flesh and bones, as ye see me have" (Lk 24:39). Since angels (good and bad) are spirit beings, they would have had to obtain bodies capable of reproduction. Being created beings, however, angels are incapable of the creative act necessary to produce such bodies. We know that they may on occasion appear in bodily form (2 Cor:11:14, Gal:1:8), but this is a long way from a physical habitation among men. Did God enter the process by making it possible for them to assume living, breathing, and sexually functioning bodies? Hardly! It is easy to see how more questions are raised than satisfactory answers given, when one begins to speculate.

Since the evidence for such an occurrence is so scanty and open to interpretation, there is no basis for assuming a dogmatic position. Sadly, some have been so taken up with the "sons of God" or other speculative issues that their effectiveness for the kingdom is compromised. May God grant us the wisdom to know when and where to stand and what is necessary in order that we might therefore follow after the things which make for peace, and things wherewith one may edify another" (Rom:14:19).

 
 
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