Question: In Isaiah 14:16, isn't the "king of Babylon" referred to as Lucifer? And in Ezekiel 28, isn't the "prince of Tyrus" being addressed? Yet I've heard these passages explained as being all about Satan. What do you think? | thebereancall.org

TBC Staff

Question: In Isaiah:14:16, isn't the "king of Babylon" referred to as Lucifer? And in Ezekiel 28, isn't the "prince of Tyrus" being addressed? Yet I've heard these passages explained as being all about Satan. What do you think?

Response: It is clearly stated that the "king of Babylon" is addressed in Isaiah:14:4 and "the prince/king of Tyrus" in Ezekiel:28:2,12. So these passages are not "all about Satan," but they definitely concern these rulers. Satan, too, is being addressed, both separately and in the person of these kings.

For example, it could never be said of the king of Babylon: "How art thou fallen from heaven, O Lucifer, son of the morning" (Is 14:12); nor could it be said of the prince/king of Tyrus, "Thou hast been in Eden the garden of God....Thou art the anointed cherub that covereth" (Ezk 28:13,14). These words can apply only to Satan.

In fact, he is presented as the one who motivated and empowered these evil kings. Satan showed Christ "all the kingdoms of the world" and boldly declared that if Christ would worship him, "All this power will I give thee, and the glory of them..." (Lk 4:5,6). Jesus said, "Get thee behind me, Satan..." (v. 8), but He did not deny Satan's ownership of the world, nor his authority to give it to whomever he would.

So in these two passages Satan is identified as the one who put these rulers in power and was behind their evil deeds-and he as well as they will be punished by God.

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